Graffiti Tags 1.png
 

GRAFFITI TAGS

 

Inspired by graffiti found in our local surroundings

 

Workshop Description


In many urban areas you can find spaces where local people have left their mark by ‘tagging’ – using spray paint or carving to write their name or pseudo-name onto a surface. Explore the tags found in your local area and have a go at creating one to represent yourself. 

 

Workshop Aims


1. Look closely at the graffiti and tags in a local urban environment 


2. Design and create a personalised tag 

 

Workshop Activities 


1. Select an area for the group to explore with lots of graffiti. Walk around together and point out lettering and styles, colour schemes etc. Discuss the names and messages they find.  


2. Return to a workspace/classroom. Participants select a name, nickname or other word to represent themselves. Show lettering in a variety of graffiti styles. Use pencil on paper to sketch out a few different ways of writing their name using the style of writing. They can make up their own styles too, or add images into the letters. 


3. Select a favourite writing style and sketch it out lightly onto a piece of card  


4. Pick a colour theme they feel represents them, or their mood today. Use a selection of markers, felt tips and paint pens to colour in the lettering. Make it more 3D by adding shadows and texture. 


5. Stick everyone’s tag up in the room to create a group graffiti wall. Invite anyone who feels comfortable to explain why they have chosen the name they have used, the lettering and colours. 

 

Materials Required

  • Plain paper to practice 

  • Quality paper or card, A5 or A4 

  • pencils, erasers, sharpeners 

  • rulers 

  • resource sheets of different graffiti lettering and printed examples from around the world 

  • marker pens, felt tips, paint pens, etc. 

 

Graffiti and street art are often put there by local people without permission which is different to artwork found in a gallery setting, that has been approved and endorsed. For this reason graffiti can display political messages, or simply assert that the artist exists, when a gallery might not allow that person or message into its space.